By Ivy M. ’17
Urban architecture
When we were walking past these buildings at Boren and Stewart, I found the reflections they cast on each other beautiful. They sparked a discussion about zoning and the impact that shadows from high buildings can have on the environment and the quality of surrounding living or working space.

Urban architecture

At 6th and Virginia, I looked up and was struck by the juxtaposition of the new building on the left and the older building on the right. In the former, the walls are almost entirely window and colored panels stick out, to give the building an interesting, and changing, appearance from far away and at different angles, while in the latter, the walls had small windows surrounded by plain white concrete. You could really see how the style of architecture had changed over time, but at the same time, some things were still the same. In particular, both buildings emphasized unbroken vertical lines running all the way up the sides.

Urban architecture

While this particular building at 6th and Lorena isn’t especially notable, what struck me wasn’t the architecture itself, but the reflections. Not only is another building reflected on one side, but you can also see multiple cranes. The proliferation of cranes was notable throughout the whole trip, and we sometimes counted up to nine cranes just by turning in place. To me, the cranes symbolized the changes that Seattle, and especially South Lake Union, are going through as the city grows and the population continues to rise.